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francisco is the largest per-capita chinese population of many in the united states in the most diverse state in the world's most averse democracy. the delegation will appreciate this as you walk the streets of san francisco at our best as it is across the state. people are living and a dancing together across every conceivable and imaginable difference. i have believed the world looks to us to say it is -- if it is possible to live together across every conceivable difference. we're proud of our home and place in history and proud of our example. but we also are humble in the context of the world we're living in. a world that is another connected but hyper-connected with a merger of i.t. and globalization. we recognize our faith -- fate is connected to the fate of others. that is the spirit that binds us together. the spirit that brings us here today. i want to close by reminding you that california is the birthplace as mayor lee was saying of life science, biotech, the home of the california stem cell institute, a state with more engineers, more scientists, more global -- nobel laurea
, and geographical locations and advantages. it is always is the gateway of the united states to china. as the economic and trade cooperation between china and the united states and california deepens, now we believe that trade and investment keeps growing. china is the third largest export destination for california. many multinationals like hp, intel, cisco, and chevron are doing well in china. they're making money in china. at the same time, as the close relationship is going on, many chinese companies are working in san francisco in california. i would like to name a few. the tsl, ciuts, just to name a few. these are successful chinese companies working here. as the american companies in china, the chinese companies working in california in san francisco are also making contributions to job creation and the development of the economy in local areas. we're thinking these are very good signs. as the previous speakers mentioned, we paid a visit to the united states last february. governor brown proposed that we set up a working group for the u.s., a state, and china provinces to coope
of the united states. when you are making laws, it is not your prerogative to put your party first. host: alright. mr. woodward. guest: as i pointed out in the book, there is scene after scene where the republicans show that they will not budge on some of these things. in their view, they are adhering to the constitution. in their view, they're doing what is necessary. but the key point is that speaker boehner is at least a nominal leader of the republicans in the house and open these negotiations last year with the president. they're all kinds of offers and discusons going back and forth on this. you can see the detail and you -- you may blameahaw obama or you may blame the republicans or you may blame me for writing this. but this is, if you will, the performance review. this is what we used to always call the best obtainable version of the truth. host: 1 last phone call for you. south carolina. caller: please let me stay few facts and don't cut me off. host: we don't have time for a few facts. caller: first, i want to compliment mr. woodward on his book. i know he is a very intelligen
, 2003, the united states was pushing very hard to get iran referred to the u.s. security council for not being forthcoming. remember that there was the war in iraq. there was a strong push on the part of the europeans, especially britain, germany, and france not to go to the security council because they saw iran going the way of iraq. going to the security council would be a mandate for war. countries like france had been at odds with the united states over iraq and did not want to be at odds with the u.s. over iran, but wanted to stop the united states from doing what it did to iraq. we had a dramatic event where the foreign ministers of germany, in october, 2003, struck an agreement where iran would embark on uranium enrichment. it is the ultimate in dual use technology. it had the united states stepping back and britain, germany, and france became known as the eu3. in november of 2004, iran went along with this saying they would also be a part of uranium enrichment. but he doesn't buy, eu3 was submitting a proposal to iran promising help for its program. this is where you get
this before. go to december, 1941, pearl harbor is bombed. the united states entered world war ii. it looks really grim. it looks like we possibly can not win this war. franklin roosevelt found a way to do it. leaders have to fix problems. i do not think it 1% of the people will remember who the speaker of the house is during world war ii. it is in the president's grasped. the president has that responsibility. what's interesting, i think president obama realizes that. i would expect governor romney, if he becomes president, would realize that, too. that is where the buck stops, as has been said. host: on obstruction, we get a lot of people talking about what mitch mcconnell said, the republican's main goal after obama wins. your reporter about what he said and the full context of what he said. guest: he's a tough guy. his goal is to make sure that obama is a one-term president. my assistant dug in to that interview. we wanted to find out when mcconnell said that and exactly what he said. it turns out what he also said in that interview was, "i don't want obama to fail. i want him to change
at the importance of kazakhstan in the region, and it's a relationship which the united states. "this is america" visits of the republic of kazakhstan. "this is america" is made possible by -- the national education association, the nation's largest advocate for children and public education. poongsan corporation, forging a higher global standard. the ctc foundation, afo communications, and the rotondaro family trust. later, i will talk with kazakhstan's foreign minister. right now, a visit with the u.s. ambassador to kazakhstan, kenneth fairfax. >> what should americans know about kazakhstan? >> i think the short answer is a lot more than they currently do. >> thank you. >> it is the ninth largest country on earth. it is a country that has a rather extraordinary relations with the united states, and yet most people really know either nothing or worse than nothing -- what they have seen in a movie, which is the opposite of reality, of course. there is a lot to learn. >> what are the mutual interests of the two countries, the united states and kazakhstan? >> we have many. you can look at it as an
's -- frappucinos. most are made in the united states. i realized why i am paying $4 for my frappucino. why is it that you are allowed to -- your able to make lenders in the united states and sell them to these specialty coffee shops. jody explained that the specialty coffee shops have very specified requirements for what they want out of their blunders. one, they don't want any moraes. why? let's say you go to barnes and noble, and i do go to the chain stores still, if you go to starbucks and the blender is making noise you are not going dillinger and going to the store. so, they want to make sure that there is absolutely no noise in the blender. second, for those of you that enjoy frappucinos you know you don't want those ice chips in there so they want to make sure that they actually crushed the ice chips properly. so, what jody was able to do is to actually work with these specialty coffee shops on the design of the blender that they want to come and that is a very difficult process to outsource. you can imagine if you were in china or brazil trying to figure out how to design something
of 20% of iran's call for sanctions, the united states there is a problem that iran to want to negotiate for a position which has changed -- you talk about 20% -- they want sanctions to be lifted with them stopping 20%. the question is they are enriching. we said their right to enrich should be recognized and that would negate all the u.n. sanctions. the nuclear issue stems from u.n. security council issues. within the margins of this issue, there is room to change going forward. i think we may find that it is constrained by the fact that israel is still there. israel is not about to let go of its concerns. i think there has been a lack of dialogue. it would be good if the two sides could sit down together. they could start with this temple and hold discussions and feel of how each side can help each other. my advice for the u.s. diplomats would be to sit with them and say we are not going to talk about the nuclear issue, how is your family. there is the fact of just discussing. on the other side, there is the problem that it is not clear what the endgame is. we're calling on iran to sus
them to bring it back into the united states that the condition that they invest in excellent capital in the united states. we tried to repatriation in 2004 and companies brought back the money and went out to shareholders and there is no actual investments in expansion of capital equipment, so i think having a compromise where you allow companies to repatriate the money coming out of the 35% tax rate, but maybe 10% to 12%, the tie that with actual metrics of expanding the workforce or investment in the united states is something we're looking at. secondly, i am president obama's proposal is a tax credit for companies to bring manufacturing back or invest back in the united states in communities and create jobs and proposed a 20% tax credit for those types of companies. why do you cut the corporate tax rate across the board? my argument for that is i don't think right now that either my law firm was investment bank of wall street needs that. i say let's target to areas that are in economic growth. so i am sympathetic to taxiing if they can be tied to accountability for companies to ac
. but the u.s. has declined. the united states has never proposed iran a comprehensive package. never. my point is this. first, try at least once. i real hi don't care in iran whether we have a conservative or moderate president or reformist because i have been working for 16 years under the presidents and i know we did our utmost to get a good -- to bring the relation, to improve the relation with the u.s. and the u.s. always declined. therefore, this is the same policy during ahmadinajed. but they have better justification during ahmadinajed. they use the holocaust and all the these rhetorics which is very harmful for iran's national interests. my suggestion is this. any u.s. administration i hope after the election -- because we cannot talk before the election -- propose at least once after 33 years a comprehensive package including terrorism, weapons of mass destruction, peace process, israel, human rights, democracy, all these major points for the u.s. and iranians also they have their own shopping list. and the u.s. also should be prepared to address iranian concerns. if it failed,
to a brilliant woman about why is it you are allowed -- able to make splendors in the united states and sell them to specialty coffee shops. jody explained the specialty coffee shops have very specified requirements for what they want out of their blenders. they don't want any noise. you go to a bunch and noble or chain stores and they have the starbucks fare and they're making noise and won't wonder and go into the stores. they want to make sure there is no noise in the blenders. secondly for those who enjoyed cappuccino you know you don't want ice chips so make sure the blenders actually crushed the ice chips properly. so what jody was able to do was actually work with the specialty coffee shops on the design of the blunders they wanted and that is a difficult process to outsource. you can imagine if you were in china or brazil trying to figure out how to design something and interacting with them would be very complicated. the customization of products that allow a small and medium-sized manufacturers know is inherently possible to do in the united states and it wasn't just jody engage in this
for the united states. hundreds of libyans amassed outside the consulate, airing signs denouncing yesterday's violent destruction which led to the death of u.s. ambassador christopher stevens and three others. in addition libyan authorities arrested four men suspected of instigating the protests. president obama called both egyptian president morsi and magariaf. the two calls had decidedly different tones. president obama expressed appreciation to libyan president magariaf for the cooperation received from the libyan government and people in responding to the attack. though questions still remain about the role libyan terrorists played in escalating the attacks. with respect to egypt the president had made an interesting comment in an interview earlier yesterday with telemundo. >> would you consider the current egyptian regime an ally of the united states? >> obama: i don't think that we would consider them an ally but we don't consider them an enemy. >> eliot: against this backdrop, president obama's phone call with egyptia
the murder thursday of four american diplomates. including united states ambassador chris stevens in benghazi, libya, in what officials believe was a terrorist attack designed to coincide with the anniversary of september 11th. and joining us dan henninger, mary anastasia o'grady and, with the anti-american protests across the arab world this week, tell us about our standing in that part of the world, and the ferment in arabia? >> well, i think, paul, what's happening here is where essentially we came in when the arab spring began in egy egypt, tunisia and spread to other countries and the feeling at that time that came out the united states couldn't really support any of these movements in the arab spring because quote unquote, we don't know who these people are, which is to say that the united states, and including the state department, just was not that engaged with these countries at that time. now, when you think of how, to what extent egypt or libya since these transitions have been in the news, it's been basically not at all on their own, and still a piece with the obama administration
from both the government and the opposition, the united states is taking the next up in normalizing our commercial relationship. >> the national football league has reached an agreement to end a labor dispute with the referees. the nfl rushed to make the deal after a botched call by replacement officials decided the outcome of a nationally televised game monday night, prompting widespread outrage from fans, journalists, and the teams. you can go to democracynow.org to see our interview with sportswriter dave zirin. in sweden, the 2012 right livelihood awards have been announced to four recipients. turkish environmental activist hayrettin karaca "for a lifetime of tireless advocacy and support for the protection and stewardship of our natural world." afghan women's activist -- a u.s. scholar gene sharp -- and to britain's campaign against arms trade -- handed out annually, the right glove awards are widely known as the alternative nobel prize. those are some of the headlines. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we begin our show with a l
about, this problem between israel and the united states over iran and what do we do about it? the prime minister is saying the united states ought to publicly draw a red line and tell iran you cannot go beyond this point in your nuclear weapons development. where do you see-- what do you see happening on this front? >> well, that's an approach i think that probably can't work, simply because the iranians may be doing things already that we don't know about. and i think it's legitimate to say, even if they don't cross the nuclear weapons threshold, if they get 90% of the way there, that's not a very comforting outcome. so let me suggest a different approach, bob. instead of red linees, let me suggest deadlines. what we ought to do is going to the iranians with a diplomatic offer and make clear what it is they have to stop doing-- all the enrichment material they have to get rid of, the international inspections they have to respect, and sanctions would be reduced and they would be out from under the risk of attack. if they don't meet the deadline, i think the united states, israel, and o
towards the united states and its citizens. >> schieffer: was this a long-planned attack, as far as you know. what do you know about that? >> the way this perpetrators acted, moved, and their choosing specific date for this so-called demonstration, i think we have no-- this leaves us with no doubt that this was preplanned, predetermined. >> schieffer: and you believe this was the work of al qaeda and you believe that it was led by foreigners. is that what you're telling us? >> it was plans definitely, was planned by forers, by people who entered the country a few months ago, and they were planning this criminal act since their arrival. >> schieffer: mr. president, is it safe for americans there now? >> the security situation is-- is difficult, not only for americans. even for libbians themselves. we don't know what are the real intentions. of these perpetrators. how they will react. but there is no specific particular concern, danger for americans or any other foreigners. but the situation is not easy to keep stability. yes >> mr. president, will it be safe for the f.b.i. investigators
of saudi intelligence, ambassador to the united states and other countries >> a throughou these 80 some years that we have had our kingdom, everybody keeps talking about an uncertain future for the kingdom and because of the sagacity of the people of saudi arabia and the good will of the leadership and the government we have survived pretty well so far we have many problems to face, including syria. many challenges internal among the ung pele and how the go about the courses of development not just economically but socially and politically and the role of women, etc. all of these are tremendous challenges that are being debated within the kingdom and not coming from the outside. >> rose: tom friedman and prince turki al-faisal when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: tom friedman is here, he is a pulitzer prize winning columnist in for the "new york times." for more than 30 years he's been writing ant foreign affairs, american politics and so much more. in addition to serving as bureau chief in beirut
that trafficking also goes on right here in the united states. it is the migrant worker unable to pay off the debt to his trafficker, the man here with a promise of a job, his documents taken and forced to work endless hours in the kitchen, the teenage girl beaten, forced to walk the streets. this should not be happening in the united states. as president i directed my administration to step up efforts, and we have. for the first time, our annual trafficking report now includes the united states, because we cannot ask other nations to do what we are not doing ourselves. we have expanded our task force to include more federal partners, including the fbi. the intelligence community is devoting more resources to identify networks, which have strengthened protections so workers know their rights. most of all, we are going after the traffickers. new anti-trafficking teams are dismantling their networks. we're putting them where they belong, behind bars. but with more than 20 million victims around the world -- more than 20 million -- we have a lot more to do. that is why this year i
of the embassy of the people's republic of china and the united states, based in washington, d.c.. and charlotte schultz, mr. mike rossi, senior adviser on jobs for governor brown. also officials from the delegation. the director-general of the department of foreign investment and administration. mr. wong shi. and mr. -- the commercial counselor of the department of corporation. and the director-general of the investment promotion agency of the ministry of commerce in china. we have more. the chairman of the tschida chamber of commerce -- china chamber of commerce. and from the china contractors association. and the president of the foreign trade and economic relations commission. and the deputy director general, department of commerce of the inner mongolia, autonomous region. the director of economic and trade office of [unintelligible] province. i would like to mention that locally, we have a city council member from fremont, ms. sue chan and supervisor malia cohen is in the house. thank you for coming. i remember not long ago when vice-president -- the vice- president visited the united state
it because he loved the work. he really thought the mission of the united states to help these fragile countries move ahead, start anew, that's what he really loved about libya. from the time that he was working to restore ties with the libyan government to being an envoy to the opposition and helping the rebels on the ground in bengzi, to now becoming the u.s. ambassador to libya, he really was someone that felt it was really important to kind of -- the democratic values and need to build proper institutions and try and have a peaceful stable country. >> we understand that he was really regarded in some ways as a hero to the rebels and the people in benghazi in particular. how did he feel? how comfortable did he feel moving around in libya? >> he felt very comfortable. that's what a lot of people are talking about today that maybe he felt a little too comfortable. chris was someone that felt very at ease in benghazi. he knew the area well. he knew the country well. so he might have not -- he might have felt a little bit more immune than some other people would to his safety because he
., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 170 and the nays are mented mouse is -- the motion is not adopted. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it. the gentleman from maryland. mr. van hollen: i ask for a recorded vote. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. those in support of the request for a recorded vote will rise and be counted. a sufficient number having arisen, a recorded vote is ordered. this will be a five-minute vote. a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 223 and the nays a
and the united states than it was 30 years ago. if you had compared 30 years ago the united states the difference between the rich and the poor here as opposed to the countries of western europe we were the most egalitarian of countries. now we are the least. we have outstripped everybody else because our capitalism has been relatively robust and when capitalism can do its thing, it polarizes and when a polarizes, it creates an awareness which is probably also occur to you. if a growing number of people are having a hard time and there are are a shrinking number of people collecting enormous wealth, it will occur to you that this is happening and it may develop a resentment against the other group. if you have a system like capitalism coexisting, not that you have to, but if you have a system of capitalism coexisting with a democratic society in which everybody has both in the following insightful occur to a lot of people. week, the majority, are really getting screwed in the economy. the way to fix it, to reverse it, to offset it is to use the political system to get that result. in the politica
of the united states, giving his first extended response to questions about yesterday's events in benghazi, libya and in cairo, egypt. >> mr. president, for the first time since 1979, a sitting ambassador, christopher stevens, plus three other americans were killed in the line of duty. we send more than a billion dollars a year to egypt, tens of millions to libya after its liberation. is it time to reconsider foreign aid to countries where many of the people don't want us around? >> well, look, the united states doesn't have an option of withdrawing from the world, and we're the one indispensable nation. countries all around the world look to us for leadership, even countries where sometimes you experience protests. so it's important for us to stay engaged, but, obviously, what happened last night was heartbreaking. and libya in particular is a government that is very friendly towards us. the vast majority of libyans welcomed the united states' involvement. they understand that it's because of us that they got rid of a dictator who would crush their spirits for 40 years. many libyans came
foundation. that is why i am running for a second term as the president of the united states. >> find any speech from the democratic or republican conventions on line at the c- span.org video library. >> paul ryan campaign to in the battleground state of nevada on friday. she talked about a new trade policy. utilizing domestic energy resources. this is about 20 minutes. ♪ >> hey, everybody. how're you doing over there? hello. wow. look at you all. man. it is so great to see you. thank you so much for coming out. i love you, too, man. thank you for coming out and stand in line. i appreciate it. i want to thank you for something else. thank you for those electoral votes and thank you for making mitt romney the next president of the united states. we have got a job to do, friends. and you know what? we have a lot of people who need jobs. and we have a big choice ahead of us. the question is, are we going to stick with four more years of the same? the same path? no. are we going to have a country in debt, doubt, and decline? or are we going to do what we need to do to get people back to wor
the united states, i am sure libya receives money. it was even greater because the american ambassador -- i am supportive of the arab spring. the times and elsewhere, i said to myself, they are not great people. but they are people that surely will turn out nice to us. it doesn't make any sense. >> the events of the last week, the embassy attacks, it will result in a further ongoing shift of jewish americans changing -- >> i think there is a little more to follow. the shift in special elections indicated deep distrust of this administration. that was clear. what the administration said, you heard what the state said. the message was sent loud and clear. for a while, i think it was always together. we have heard the state department say that they have taken every reasonable step. we have heard the quote from the ambassador suggesting he was comfortable and these people love me. it's not true. he issued a statement saying he is very concerned about his own safety. again, we have an information gap. that is coming home to roost. this will build. >> today's new york times, the interview with th
and are receiving reports this morning of the attacks against the united states embsy in cairo and the u.s. consulate in bengazi in libya. in libya, our ambassador chris stevens and three other americans were killed in the service of our nation. our thoughts and sympathies today are with the families of these brave americans. these attacks remind us of the sacrifices made on a daily basisaway foreign service officers, diplomatic security personnel and our marine security guards. i joi my colleagues in strongly condemning the murder of these innocent americans, and i strongly support employing every available tool at our dissal to ensure t safety of americans overseas and to hunt down those responsible for these attacks. yesterday, we commemorated the anniversary of the attacks of september 11, and today we are reminded that brave americans serve us every day at the risk of their own lives. we honor the americans we lost in libya and we will stand united in our response. among the things we can agree on in washington is that the attacks on the u.s. and its representatives ll be met with r
of the united states in our region encourages extremism. >> surprising. how would you feel if one of your children dated a jew? and heated. especially when i asked him about basic human rights for gays. >> do you really believe that someone is born homosexual? >> yes, i absolutely believe that. yes. >> i'm sorry. let me ask you this. do you believe that anyone has given birth through homosexuality? homosexuality ceases procreation. >>> good evening. welcome to a special edition of "piers morgan tonight." looking live at new york city, home of the united nations. world leaders from 193 countries are gathering for the annual meeting of the general assembly. president mahmoud ahmadinejad will address the meeting on wednesday. he had blistering words at israel today. more on that in a moment. he took aim at the security council on the subject of iran's nuclear program. >> translator: we have business that some members of the security council with little rights have chosen silence with regard to the nuclear warheads of the fake regime while at the same time they impede scientific progress of o
frappucinos early in the united states. my first learned that i sit now i know why pay $4 for my frappucinos. i said why is it that you are allowed to -- you are able to make blunders in the united states come and sell them to the specialty coffee shops, and she explained that the specialty coffee shops have specified requirements. one, they won't want illinois is they have starbucks and of the blenders are making noise you aren't going to go into the store. so they want to make sure that there is no malaise. second for those of you you know you don't want those ice chips in there so they want to make sure that it's actually crushed the ice chips properly. so, what he was able to do is actually work with a specialty coffee shop on the design of the blunder they wanted and that is a difficult process to outsource. if you are in china and brazil figuring out how to design something interesting with them would be very complicated. as of the customization of the products that a lot of the small and medium-size manufacturers build is actually inherently impossible to do in the united states and w
leaders are leading the reform process. united states is committed to protecting the space for civil society to operate and the critical role plays in transitioning democracy all over the world. with a greater emphasis on a broader range of u.s. power, president obama succeeded in laying a new foundation for leadership in the world. nowhere do you see this more clearly than the commitment to the area that you focus on for the remainder of my remarks, the development in poverty and prosperity. the presiden was unapologetic, putting to rest the old myth that development is near charity. rejecting the notion that they were condemned by the gains in human developments. as such, the national security strategy recognizes development in the moral, strategic, and economic imperatives. on that day he announced the new u.s. global development policy. the premise is on the conviction that the ultimate goal of foreign assistance and development is to create the conditions with the assistance are no longer needed. focusing on helping these broad base -- is broadbased economic growth, prioritizing
know one thing about him. he does not fail. let's hear it for the next president of the united states. [applause] >> thanks, sweetie. that's quite an introduction here. i got how many introductions tonight? anyone else want to offer an introduction? thank you. this really is a critical time for the country, and i think a time of choice. elections are always about choice. i think the choice is in more stark relief than most electrics. i think in part because of where the country is. i think when you have $16 trillion in debt, when you see places like europe facing fiscal calamity or crisis, while you recognize these are critical times, what you have in this country, 23 million americans out of work, 23 million. when half the kids coming out of college can't find work or work consistent with an education that includes college, think about that? this is america. what's happened? and so the president and i offered two very distinct paths. his path is one which has been not just spoken about, we've seen it. we don't have to guess what his path might look like or what he would do, because h
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,533 (some duplicates have been removed)